Issue Out of the Frying Pan

As told by Alex Scott

The Team

Matt Duke | Liam Moore, Luke Oliver, Marcel Seip, Robbie Threlfall | Richie Jones, Adamn Reed, Michael Flynn, Kyel Reid | Jamie Devitt, Craig Fagan | Mark Stewart, Luke O'Brien, Michael Bryan

Hereford’s new Director of Football Gary Peters likened to himself to “Red Adair” when he took over at Edgar Street, in reference to his track record of rescuing struggling clubs, and these qualities will be required in abundance if the Bulls are to escape their predicament. On Saturday’s evidence they may not be alone in that assessment. A disjointed, uninspiring display from Bradford resulted in them leaving with exactly what they deserved, now only out of the relegation zone on goal difference.

Phil Parkinson decided to recall Jamie Devitt and Adam Reed into the starting eleven with Devitt playing off Craig Fagan and Reed partnering Flynn in the middle. This again forced Ritchie Jones out to the right flank, something seen often over recent weeks without the midfielder ever looking comfortable. Marcel Seip, replacing the suspended Davies and the departed Branston alongside Luke Oliver, stands as one of the only success stories to come out of the game for the Bantams, putting in an assured performance in the heart of the City backline in the face of a testing aerial barrage throughout.

The match started slowly in the sleepy confines of Edgar Street, only awakened by the sporadic calls of the hordes of school children shipped in for today’s game, cited as a must-win for Hereford by manager Jamie Pitman. What was seen on the pitch would be better described as rugby than football. Little focus or energy was expended on ball retention or build up play, instead focusing on field position and set pieces. Long throws and corners were the entry point of choice for Hereford, and both sides spent the majority of the game attempting to find touch deep in the opposition half. This was obviously the game plan of Hereford who boasted a physical side, led by lanky midfielder Harry Pell and their powerful forward Nathan Elder.

It would be nice to say that Phil Parkinson’s side attempted to play football around the rigidly defensive Bulls, but it wouldn’t be accurate, they were just as bad. Hereford brought Bradford down to their level with remarkable ease.

Neither side showed the attacking intent or skill to indicate any goals were forthcoming and it was clear early on that this game would be decided by mistakes. A couple of marking mishaps in the City backline led to first half chances for Elder and Pell which were spurned, and after a corner was poorly cleared Stephen Leslie rocketed a shot destined for the top corner before the intervention of Duke who tipped the ball onto the bar. This was a startling moment of skill, entirely out of context in a game such as this. Bradford’s best chance fell to Craig Fagan who crashed the ball over the bar from close range after good work from Devitt set him clean through on goal.

The second half picked up where the first left off, seemingly destined for 0-0 until the ejection of Michael Flynn changed the course of the game. City’s captain could have no complaints about his sending off, the second booking coming after the Welshman cynically brought down the surging Pell outside the City area. Stephen Leslie, who had two long distance shots saved well by Duke up to this point then dispatched the ball into top corner. Leslie, recruited by Peters from Shrewsbury soon after his arrival was clearly Hereford’s key man and it was of little surprise he was the difference in the game.

It’s easy to blame Duke for the concession of another long range strike but there was little he could do about this one, and he had made two impressive saves from distance before this. What should be more of a worry is the performance of the outfield players who showed a distinct lack of invention and skill throughout. Hereford flooded the midfield, restricting the space for Devitt to work, and doubled up on Kyel Reid leading to Bradford running out of ideas all too quickly. In lieu of attempting to work through the rigid defensive lines, Parkinson’s men instead resorted to pumping the ball long in the vague direction of Craig Fagan and the corner flags, worryingly reminiscent of the Jackson era.  

Fagan cut a frustrated character throughout spending large periods of the game isolated, chasing after a succession of lost causes. This frustration grew as the game wore on and culminated at the final whistle as Fagan angrily attempted to smash the ball out of the ground amongst the euphoric celebrations of the Hereford contingent, before heading straight for the tunnel. After the support, or lack thereof, he received from his teammates during the game, this was easy to understand.

After Leslie’s opener the mood around Edgar Street noticeably lifted, the confidence began to flow throughout the team, and there was little doubt in which end the next goal would come. Parkinson altered to a 3-4-2 with Luke O’Brien taking over in central midfield, this left City exposed to the counter, and after a probing run at the heart of the defence, the impressive Tom Barkhuizen neatly played a one two with substitute Yoann Arquin before slotting past Duke.

Arquin’s introduction along with the ever more rotund Delroy Facey at 0-0 showed the endeavour of the Bulls who could see this game was for the taking, and both contributed well as Hereford closed out what would prove to be a relatively easy win.

After the game Phil Parkinson placed the blame at the feet of Michael Flynn for the defeat, but this rather seems an easy excuse for the City manager. In truth the side deserved nothing more and a better opponent would have exposed them to a far greater extent. Bradford also got away with what looked a certain penalty before the opener, Jones handling in the area. It’s difficult to recall a shot in anger on the Hereford goal nor any periods of sustained pressure from Parkinson’s men. With the exception of the suspended Davies and the injured Syers, this would probably represent the strongest side possible, and they looked thoroughly unimpressive throughout. Flynn is now set for a two match suspension missing next week’s games against Northampton and Macclesfield thanks to his fifth booking in the midst of his red card.

Peters’ impact on the struggling Bulls cannot be underestimated, for the second straight game he spent the second half on the touchline alongside manager Jamie Pitman, and it was clear that he was heavily involved in the management of the side. Five goals and four points in the two games since his arrival illustrate the impact which he has had on the West Midlands club, and while Bradford have improved markedly since the start of the season they remain in the same position, struggling for points, struggling for consistency, and looking over their shoulder with greater urgency with each passing week. Whilst Bradford look to have the talent and fire power not to have to call on a Red Adair or a Boots Hansen, the fact they are struggling to escape the grasps of the relegation zone is beginning to worry.


BfB is pleased to welcome Alex Scott to our band of Bantams. Alex’s own Bradford City website Concentrate On The League is on our must read lists and we point you towards it.