Issue #70 Why I was glad to see the back of Mark Yeates after Bradford City beat Crawley Town 1-0

As told by Michael Wood

The Team

Jordan Pickford | Stephen Darby, Rory McArdle, Gary McKenzie, James Meredith | Christopher Routis, Matt Dolan, Andy Halliday | Mark Yeates | Francois Zoko, James Hanson | Billy Knott, Alan Sheehan, Jon Stead

Mark Stephen Anthony Yeates walked up to the three official who had been in charge of the game between Bradford City Football Club and Crawley Town Football Club in the game which Bradford City Football Club had won by one goal to nil and Mark Stephen Anthony Yeates put his hand out. Mark Stephen Anthony Yeates of Bradford City Football Club shook the hand of one assistant referees. Then Mark Stephen Anthony Yeates shook the hand of the second assistant referee. Mark Stephen Anthony Yeates did not shake the hand of the Referee. Mark Stephen Anthony Yeates turned his back on the Referee and walked away without shaking his hand.

Jordan Pickford did not shake the hand of the Referee Darren Drysdale. Stephen Mark Darby did not shake his hand. James Meredith did not shake Mr Drysdale’s hand after the game and Rory Alexander McArdle did not shake Mr Drysdale’s hand. Alan Sheehan did not shake the Referee Darren Drysdale’s hand and Billy Knott did not shake the Referee Darren Drysdale’s hand. James Robert Hanson did not shake the Referee’s hand and Jonathan Graeme Stead did not shake the Referee’s hand. Bernard François Dassise Zoko scored the winning goal early in the game and he returned to the field at the end to walk around the field with his team mates but Bernard François Dassise Zoko did not shake the Referee Darren Drysdale’s hand.

In 2008 Darren Drysdale said that Dean Windass had sworn at him in the car park after a game. Bradford City complained and Windass insisted that Drysdale was lying but the FA backed their Referee at the time. It is seven years on and Drysdale is still refereeing in League One.

After watching Bradford City Football Club play Crawley Town Football Club in April 2012 Philip John Parkinson watched the players of Bradford City Football Club brawl with the players of Crawley Town Football Club. He watched Crawley Town Football Club win promotion while he continued to assemble a team at Bradford City Football Club that would gain honours for Bradford City Football Club.

It is said by the people who say things that Philip John Parkinson was very close to being dismissed from his role at Bradford City Football Club following that brawl but that Philip John Parkinson continued and Philip John Parkinson created a team that beat Arsenal Football Club and Aston Villa Football Club and Wigan Athletic Football Club as well as Burton Albion Football Club and Torquay United Football Club and Northampton Town Football Club.

Philip John Parkinson made a team which won games by small margins because Philip John Parkinson had a belief in how football should be played and who should be playing it. Football, Philip John Parkinson believed, should be played by people who believed in their team mates and battled for their team mates and who believed in Philip John Parkinson and who battled for Philip John Parkinson.

City won by a single goal in a tough game against Crawley. The number of changes to the side caused by injury, suspension, and the saving players for the Reading FA Cup tie put out a disrupted team but even with changes the work ethic of the team remained.

The only goal of the game came eight minutes in when a deep cross should have been caught by Crawley keeper Lewis Price but his positioning suggested he thought the ball would clear François Zoko. It did not, and Zoko headed in.

Then City contained rather than pressed. Crawley were poor – they seem set for a first Football League relegation this summer – but since Parkinson arrived the frequency which other teams are made to look poor by a City team prepared to close down quickly and apply spoiling pressure has increased. City scored, and then made sure they would not concede, and won the game.

But that win was a battle on a heavy pitch with a curious referee and a broken up team. In many ways it was the game which City fans say they want: a hard battle that is won by graft;

Odd that it was not better supported in a quiet Valley Parade.